celebrex drug classification

Paid to Lie: Big Pharma is Taking Evasive Action to Try and Stop Legalization

March 11, 2015 by  
Filed under Drug Companies

:lol: GRATITUDE JOY!   :lol:
Oct. 2, 2014

Big Pharma is Taking Evasive Action to Try and Stop Legalization

Paid to Lie

In the 1994 film Clerks, directed by Kevin Smith, the hapless manager of a convenience store finds himself at odds with a man in a business suit who warns other customers not to buy cigarettes. After informing them of the health hazards, the man suggests they buy a particular type of chewing gum instead of cigarettes. 

This continues until the man is finally forced to admit that he is not a real doctor or expert, but a paid representative of a chewing gum company. Even though what the “expert” said about smoking may be true, his credibility is blown, and the man in the business suit goes from being an authority to a conniving huckster.

Across America, the cannabis legalization movement has continued, with states like Colorado and Washington earning millions in tax revenue while their crime rates drop. News agencies like NPR, CBS and MSNBC respond by interviewing experts on the subject in order to presumably give their audience the best, most objective opinion.

Usually, these experts belong to, or at least claim to represent, health care groups, political parties, unions and the like. 

One such expert, Rhode Island Representative Patrick Kennedy, is the founder of Project SAM (Smart Approaches to Marijuana), a group opposed to cannabis legalization. Kennedy often ends up as a guest speaker at events such as ones put on by Community Anti-Drug Coalition of America (CADCA), where he argues that legalizing cannabis will only create more addicts and a nation of people with terminal illnesses.

CADCA is sponsored by many organizations that stand to lose a lot of money if cannabis is finally legalized on a federal level. Drug companies such as Pfizer and Purdue, both manufacturers of prescription drugs such as OxyContin and Zohydrol, have given millions to groups like CADCA and politicians like Kennedy, in order to keep their opposition is illegal. Since cannabis is a great replacement for a lot of these highly addictive opioids, paying experts to condemn it makes sense. It’s good business.

Big businesses donating millions in campaign contributions to politicians for special treatment is old news. Do professors get paid off, too? Sure. The opinions of Dr. Herbert Kleber of Columbia University can be found within the media produced by agencies such as NPR, Fox News and CNBC. He claims that cannabis is bad, and can lead to the usual dangers including addiction, terminal health issues and mental illness.

But Dr. Kleber is a highly-paid consultant for companies such as Purdue Pharma, Reckitt Benckiser and Alkermes, all manufacturers of prescription pharmaceuticals such as Nurofen, giving him more than enough motive to demonize the one substance that will put his bosses out of business. Not only is that immoral, it’s also not objective, which means it’s bad science.

But Kleber isn’t just an expert cited by the media. His opinions are spread far and wide, cited by agencies such as the New York State Association of Chiefs of Police and the American Psychiatric Association, both 800-lb gorillas when it comes to making politicians pass laws that keep cannabis illegal and jail Americans for using it, while the painkiller industry continues to crank out drugs like Oxycontin, and other opioids, which kill 16,000 Americans a year.

The industries Patrick Kennedy, CADCA and Dr. Kleber get their money from aren’t worth millions, they are worth billions. The kind of money that is more than enough to buy elections many times over, corrupting democracies and scientific institutions alike, but it’s just a short-term investment for a long-term profit made at the expense of innocent Americans.